Money For Lunch – Pilates and LAB5 Fitness

Pilates and LAB5 Fitness

September 6, 2012 11:25 PM0 commentsViews: 23

What is Pilates?

Pilates is a form of physical fitness exercise developed by Joseph Pilates in the early part of the 20th century. Sometimes referred to as Contrology, this method focuses on the idea that the mind controls the muscles. A typical Pilates routine is designed to increase the flexibility, strength, coordination and endurance of the body.

Today, over 14 millions of people around the world practice it, and they swear by its ability to shape a new, youthful body. While its popularity has grown considerably only in the past few years, the Pilates system has lasted nearly a century, with no signs of slowing down.

Joseph Pilates
Joseph Pilates was born in a small town outside of Dusseldorf, Germany. He grew up there as a small and sickly child who had asthma, rickets and rheumatoid fever. At a young age, he was fascinated with the human anatomy, and he studied everything he could about it. He eventually opened up his own gym, and he began to teach his own methods to people who were suffering from similar diseases to those he had. He taught that people who are exercising must do it slowly and smoothly in order to do it correctly.

The Birth of Pilates
Joseph and his wife Clara taught the art of Contrology, or the art of control, to people in the 1920s who had debilitating diseases. This is why the slow, methodical movements of Pilates were developed. The patients were using homemade equipment that provided resistance and did not require them to overexert themselves. Early on, Pilates was something that caught on well with dancers and a small core of fitness enthusiasts, but nobody expected the surge it has had in the past decade.

Pilates continues its reign as one of the most commonly practiced exercise routines in the world. It began as a way to give patients, who lacked the ability to do most workouts, a way to overcome their illnesses. It turned into a phenomenon that seems to have no end in sight.

Why Choose Pilates
When people think about a dancer’s body, they admire the dancer’s muscle tone and flexibility. This is completely possible to acquire through Pilates, even if people cannot dance a step. Pilates requires participants to think about moving their bodies and flexing certain muscles in a slow and deliberate way, focusing on their breathing as they move through a series of precise movements. Literally anyone can do it, at any fitness level. Part of the appeal of Pilates is the slow and deliberate pace, rather than frantic cardio or intense weight lifting. Similar to yoga or physical therapy, Pilates is the perfect exercise regime because it requires little more than a mat and a bottle of water. Participants lift and lower their own bodies, using their own tension and resistance to attain strength and tone.

Widely available across the world, Pilates is perfect for beginning exercisers to professional athletes and everyone in between. Even NFL players have participated in Pilates to increase flexibility and therefore prevent injury on the field. Athletes of any caliber should consider Pilates to improve flexibility, tone and provide a physical and mental challenge. Many well known entertainers practice Pilates including Christi Brinkley, Kelly Ripa, Chuck Norris and Olivia Newton-John and many others.

LAB5 Pilates
We utilize a hybrid style of Pilates using the fundamental principles established by Joseph Pilates with our customized reformers at a faster and fun pace still guaranteed to achieve maximum results. Also, most of our classes are conducted in a group environment with a talented trainer to watch over you but allow the price points much more reasonable than traditional Pilates studios.

 

Alan & Bonnie Cashman

Be fit, be healthy, be happy

 

Interested in learning more about how to Live the Good Life? Visit the Cashman Lifestyle homepage.

In need of more healthy tips, or looking for a great workout? LAB5Fitness.com is full of fitness and health related topics, visit us today! 

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